En Gedi's Gate

Always Employing Biblical Truth and Discernment!


Micaiah: A Profile in Courage

Micaiah: A Profile in Courage


Posted By on Aug 12, 2021

Being the LORD’s prophet carried with it the utmost responsibility to God because prophets were bound to speak God’s Word accurately [“Thus says the LORD”] regardless of the consequences (Deut. 13, 18).  Many of them suffered immeasurably for the truth they heralded, and often their divine call encompassed warning evil, disobedient, and prideful kings of God’s impending judgment.  Moreover, because of their continual admonitions, many times their lives were in jeopardy.  Micaiah1 was one of those courageous prophets, who God called to prophesy the shameful and terminal fate of an evil king.  Furthermore, Micaiah’s stern warning opposed the evil kings favored four-hundred false prophets, who loyally placated their master.   This occurred in approximately 850 B.C., during the time when Israel was a divided nation consisting of ten northern tribes (Israel) and two southern tribes (Judah). There were also two kings—the exceedingly wicked King Ahab who ruled the north and King Jehoshaphat who ruled the south.  King Ahab desired to wage war against the nation of Syria to reclaim the city of Ramoth-Gilead, which Syria occupied.  Ahab requested Jehoshaphat that they join forces to conquer Syria and take back what belonged to Israel.  Jehoshaphat wanted Ahab to seek a word from the LORD to determine if attacking Syria would be propitious (1 Kin. 22:3-5, 2 Chr. 18:3-4).  King Ahab sought counsel from false four-hundred prophets that were under his rule: “And they said, ‘Go up, for the Lord will give it into the hand of the king.’” (1 Kin. 22:6b).  The New American Commentary notes: “not one of whom was an acceptable prophet of Yahweh.  One of the marks of a true prophet was that he often stood alone against the opinion of others who made prophetic claims (1 Chr. 36:16; 2 Kgs 17:13-15; Neh 9:26; Jer 25:4, 26:4-5, 28, 29:24-32; cf. Matt 23:33-37).  For Jehoshaphat the fact that all those prophets agreed was sufficient evidence they were in collusion.” 2   Unsatisfied with King Ahab’s illegitimate prophets, King Jehoshaphat asked Ahab if there was a legitimate prophet of the LORD to consult (1 Kin. 22:7, 2 Chr. 18:6).  Reluctantly, Ahab called for the prophet Micaiah whom he loathed, claiming: “… He does not prophesy good concerning me, but evil.” (1 Kin. 22:8, 2 Chr. 18:7) –ironically, Micaiah was a truthful prophet. Attempting to pressure Micaiah Ahab’s messenger said: “Please let your word be like the word of one of them [the false prophets] and speak favorably.” (1 Kin. 22:13, 2 Chr. 18:12).  Micaiah answered exhibiting a courageous and obedient faith: “As the LORD lives, what the LORD says to me, that I will speak.” (1 Kin. 22:14, cf. 2...

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Six Twenty-Four Hour Day Creation

Six Twenty-Four Hour Day Creation


Posted By on May 25, 2021

“Blessed are they who did not see, and yet believed.” Jn. 20:29 One question many Christians wrestle with is: “Did God create the universe in billions of years or in six literal twenty-four-hour days, as the Bible claims in Genesis chapter one?”  This has been the subject of theological debates for centuries.  Many fastidious defenders of the Scripture, who ardently uphold the numerous miracles the Bible claims, surprisingly reject the miracle of creation in six-day literal days.  It’s especially disturbing to learn that a vast majority of Christian teaching institutions, have abandoned the literal teaching of the first three chapters of Genesis.  Dr. John MacArthur, president emeritus of The Master’s Seminary observed: “I recall reading a survey a few years ago which revealed that in one of America’s leading evangelical accrediting associations, whose membership boasted scores of evangelical Bible colleges and universities, only five or six college-level schools remain solidly opposed to the old-earth view of creation. The rest are open to a reinterpretation of Genesis 1-3 that accommodates evolutionary theories.” If you interpret the creation account of Genesis one literally and in context, you will unquestionably end up with a six twenty-four-hour day creation: “And there was evening and there was morning, one day”.  The wording in the Bible is ostensive and fundamental to comprehending God’s omniscience in creation: “By the word of the LORD the heavens were made, and by the breath of His mouth all their host…For He spoke, and it was done; He commanded, and it stood fast.” (Ps. 33:6, 9).   Yom “...And there was evening and there was morning, one day.”       Gen. 1:5 The Hebrew word yom (day)in the context of Genesis chapter one, clearly meansa twenty-four-hour period: “And there was evening and there was morning, one day.” (Gen. 1:5, also see 1:8, 13, 19, 22, 31).  One need not be a Hebrew scholar to understand that God through Moses, communicated the creation account in a simplistic manner.  He employed similar simplicity in the prologue of John’s Gospel, so the reader could easily apprehend both, Jesus Christ’s deity and His humanity (Jn. 1:1-18).  However, despite the unambiguous translation from Hebrew to our English versions, many professing Christians still deny that the Bible presents a literal six twenty-four-hour day creation.  For instance, they interpret yom (day)to mean exceedingly long periods of time, i.e. millions and millions of years.  Dr. Allen P. Ross commenting on yom (day) made this observation: The meaning of the term “day” (yom) in this chapter [Genesis 1] has received varying interpretations.  Although the word normally means a twenty-four-hour day, it can also mean a longer general period of time (Isa. 61:2)...

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“ …My father, you have given your word to the LORD; do to me as you have said…” Judges 11:36    Imagine feeling elated anticipating your father’s return home after he was away at war for a long period of time.  Moreover, you have heard reports of his triumphant campaign and burst out the door of his house in celebration to greet him. Such was the case regarding Jephthah’s daughter (“… [she came] out to meet him with tambourines and with dancing…”),when her father and “judge” of Israel, arrived home (Jud. 11:34).  However, her exuberance quickly turned to sorrow after seeing and hearing her father express anguish upon seeing her, “…he tore his clothes and said, ‘Alas, my daughter! You have brought me very low, and you are among those who trouble me; for I have given my word to the LORD, and I cannot take it back.’” (Jud. 11:35).  Tragically, Jephthah so desperately wanted victory in battle over the Ammonites, that he made an imbecilic and costly oath to God: “If Thou wilt indeed give the sons of Ammon into my hand, then it shall be that whatever comes out of the doors of my house to meet me when I return in peace from the sons of Ammon, it shall be the LORD’s, and I will offer it up as a burnt offering.” (Jud. 11:30-31).  That pledge turned out to be his only child and precious virgin daughter, who emerged from his house.  Tragically, her jubilance for the occasion would prove to be in vain, for she inadvertently was celebrating her own sacrifice.  The New American Commentary’, Daniel Block notes: “Not only would she die, never having conceived and borne a child, but because Jephthah had no other children, his seed would die with her …with his vow Jephthah tried to secure his present, but through it he ends up sacrificing his future.” 1 Scripture does not reveal if Jephthah told his daughter the details of his vow, but her knowledge of her father’s triumph was accurate: “So she said to him, ‘My father, you have given your word to the LORD; do to me as you have said, since the LORD has avenged you of your enemies, the sons of Ammon.’” (Jud. 11:36, cf. Num. 30:2, Eccl. 5:4-5).  Moreover, Jephthah’s daughter spoke words that most of us, if not all of us, would never dare utter: “…do to me [kill me] as you have said [vowed]”.  If she was made aware that her father’s pledge entailed her being slain and offered as a burnt sacrifice, she appeared undaunted.  Her courage in the face of imminent physical...

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You Must Die First to Live at Last

You Must Die First to Live at Last


Posted By on Jan 1, 2021

Agrarian Metaphors for Resurrection Truth— It is concerning how many Christians are increasingly adhering to this temporal life, when believers know death is inevitable and heavenly bliss awaits.  Scripture teaches we will “obtain an inheritance which is imperishable and undefiled and will not fade away, reserved in heaven” (1 Pet. 1:4); yet some cling to that which is fading away.  When a Christian dies his soul immediately is with Jesus Christ in heaven, “…absent from the body and to be present with the Lord.” (2 Cor. 5:8, cf. Luke 23:43).  Moreover, in the future our physical bodies will resurrect, be united with our souls and live gloriously with the Lord for all eternity.  Jesus used an agrarian illustration when instructing His disciples; not only of His death and resurrection, but the miraculous power He will have when He is glorified: “The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains by itself alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.” (Jn. 12:23b, 24—emphasis added).   Dr. John MacArthur explains: “As the sown kernel dies to bring forth a rich harvest, so also the death of the Son of God will result in the salvation of many.” 1 The Apostle Paul also employed an agrarian metaphor when he rebuked the doubting Corinthian believers, regarding the certainty of the resurrection and the amazing metamorphosis which takes place: “You fool! That which you sow does not come to life unless it dies.  And that which you sow, you do not sow the body which is to be, but a bare grain, perhaps of wheat or of something else.  But God gives it a body just as He wished, and to each of the seeds a body of its own. (1 Cor. 15:36-38).   As Dr. John MacArthur states: Before Christ could bear fruit of salvation for us, He had to die.  Likewise, before we can participate in the fruit of His resurrection, or bear fruit in His service, we too must die…The seed loses its identity as a seed and becomes more and more like a mature plant.  But the seed itself…looks nothing like the mature plant, the body which is to be.  Only after ceasing to be a seed does it become the mature plant the farmer harvests 2     When we receive resurrected bodies, wewill become complete and equipped for everlasting life in heaven.  That truth appears inconceivable and unimaginable to our finite understanding; yet we will no longer have a veiled understanding of God: “Beloved, now we are children...

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“Strengthening the souls of the disciples, encouraging them to continue in the faith, and saying, “Through many tribulations we must enter the kingdom of God.” Acts 14:22 The Apostle Paul having just healed a lame man, so captivated the people of Lystra, they extolled him and Barnabas as gods, even called them Zeus and Hermes (Acts 14:8-11).  However, envious and unbelieving Jews came from Iconium and Antioch (cities Paul had previously preached and experienced hostility) and persuaded the multitude, to turn violently against him.  Poisoned by Satanic lies, the fickle crowd that only moments prior deified Paul, now stoned him and dragged him out of the city supposing he was dead (Acts 14:19).  When Paul’s disciples gathered around him, he arose and entered the city.  Amazingly, the very next day he and Barnabas embarked on the sixty-mile trek to the city of Derbe, and once arriving there they preached the gospel (Acts 14:21).  The Lord performed a supernatural healing on Paul, for he must have been in a bloody pulp and in a moribund state.  G. Campbell Morgan wrote: “Paul was writing to Timothy, the young minister, his last letter and said to him: ‘You know the persecutions I endured at Antioch, at Iconium, at Lystra, but out of them all the Lord delivered me’ (2 Tim. 3:11).  At Antioch and Iconium He delivered him by saving him from the stones.  At Lystra He delivered him through stoning.” 1 After winning many converts at Derbe, Paul boldly returned to Antioch, Iconium, and Lystra–the very cities where he was castigated (Acts 14:21).   So, why did Paul return to such a hostile and insidious venue?  Most believers, if not all, would have refrained from returning to such a pernicious environment.  However, Paul did not faint from risking his life in order to honor his unique calling required by the Lord (Acts 9:15-16, Gal. 1:15-16).  Furthermore, Paul selflessly wanted to encourage the brethren, who may have witnessed firsthand the pandemonium and violence against him.  Paul encouraged them to abide in faith, declaring: “…Through many tribulations we must enter the kingdom of God.” (Acts 14:22b).   In the same manner, Paul recounted that life-threatening experience in Lystra and with it exhorted his young fellow soldier in the faith, Timothy: “Persecutions, and sufferings, such as happened to me at Antioch, at Iconium and at Lystra; what persecutions I endured, and out of them all the Lord delivered me!  Yes, and all who desire to live godly in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution.”  (2 Tim. 3:11-12).  In fact, on numerous occasions Paul strengthened the brethren in the newly established churches who were enduring great persecution (Acts...

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Jesus “Opened not His Mouth”

Jesus “Opened not His Mouth”


Posted By on Nov 28, 2020

On that dark night, Peter, one of Jesus’ disciple acted impetuously but sincerely when he wielded a sword and hacked off the ear of the slave of Israel’s high priest, Malchus. (Matt. 26:51, John 18:10).  Peter attempted to defend his Lord from the armed mob that came to arrest Him, however such protection was not needed by Jesus.  After miraculously restoring the man’s severed ear (Luke 22:51), Jesus said to Peter: “Or do you think that I cannot appeal to My Father, and He will at once put at My disposal more than twelve legions of angels?” (Matt. 26:52—emphasis added).  This is a fascinating declaration by the Lord Jesus Christ and one worth investigating further.  In the time of Christ, a legion of Roman military was made up of 6,000 soldiers.  And yet, Jesus could have beckoned for more than twelve legions of angels to come instantly to His aid.  This would mean 72,000 warrior angels!  It is recorded in Scripture that a single Angel protected Israel by slaying 185,000 Assyrian soldiers in one night (2 Kin. 19:35).  So, multiplying 185,000 [men] x 72,000 [angels] equals 13,320,000,000.  Amazingly, if Jesus so desired, He could have had His angels slay more than 13,320,000,000 men!  This astronomical figure is nearly two times today’s world population.   Therefore, if Jesus chose to resist arrest and fight the Roman soldiers and the raucous throng that came for Him, it undoubtedly would have been ridiculously easy for Him to overcome: “Behold, the nations are like a drop from a bucket, and are regarded as a speck of dust on the scales; behold, He lifts up the islands like fine dust.” (Isa. 40:15).  Instead, Jesus went with them silently and without the slightest struggle; “He opened not His mouth.” (Isa. 53:7, cf. 1 Pet. 2:23).  O how fortunate it was that “the Scriptures be fulfilled, that it must happen this way?” (Matt. 26:54).  That the Son of God remained obedient to His Father’s will regardless of the circumstance: “…Truly, truly, I say to you, the Son can do nothing of Himself…I do not seek My own will, but the will of Him who sent Me.” (Jn. 5:19a, 30b).  And what was the Father’s will?  Answer: for His Son to remain humble, obedient, silent, and suffer a horrendous death on the cross for undeserving sinners.  In other words, Jesus willingly received the cup of His Father’s wrath as propitiation for the sins of all believing mankind.  All things leading up to Jesus’ crucifixion, and the crucifixion itself, occurred exactly as God preordained it: The kings of the earth took their stand, and the rulers were gathered together...

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“And immediately the Spirit impelled Him to go out into the wilderness.” Mark 1:12 When most Christians think of Jesus Christ’s suffering, they usually think of His crucifixion; when He atoned for the sins of those who would believe in Him.  It is true Jesus suffered excruciating physical pain at the hands of evil men, and infinitely more from His Father’s wrath poured out on Him on the cross (Acts 2:23, Isa. 53:10, cf. Heb. 4:15).  However, Jesus suffered His entire ministry: “For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.” (Mark 10:45).  The moment after Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist, Scripture records the Holy Spirit immediately drove Jesus into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil (Mark 1:10, 12).   Of the three synoptic Gospels that record the Temptation of Christ, only the Gospel of Mark documents Jesus being forcefully driven into the wilderness by the Holy Spirit: “And immediately the Spirit impelled 1 Him to go out into the wilderness.” (Mark 1:12).   Interestingly, the Holy Spirit who only previously gently rested on Jesus “like a dove”, had violently driven the Suffering Servant into the wilderness to be tested.    Furthermore, God’s Word states Jesus fasted forty days in that arid, parched desert.  John MacArthur notes: [The Gospels] Matthew and Luke indicate that Jesus went the entire forty-day period without food (Matt. 4:2, Luke 4:2) …He had to face and conquer His strongest enemy even when He was at His weakest.  Mark’s description of Jesus’ temptation implies that the Lord was being tempted by Satan throughout the entire six-week period 2    Additionally, Jesus was ordained by God to suffer from the time of His Temptation to the time of His death on the cross. (Mark 1:12, Acts 3:18, 4:27-28).   Moreover, He suffered at the hands of man’s [and God’s] greatest foe, Satan.  It is a staggering truth to contemplate, that “God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have eternal life.” (Jn. 3:16).  Jesus suffered immensely in His physical life, so believers will not suffer in their eternal life: “He made Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.” (2 Cor. 5:21).  Hallelujah, what a Savior!    1 Impelled, Ekballo: To lead one forth or away somewhere with a force which he cannot resist.”, Biblehub.com, Thayer’s Greek Lexicon, Electronic Database.   Copyright © 2002, 2003, 2006, 2011 by Biblesoft, Inc.  2 John MacArthur, The MacArthur...

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“Jesus said to her, ‘I who speak to you am He.’” John 4:26 Recognizing Jesus as the Messiah is integral part of understanding His completeness and omnipotence in the Bible.  Dr. John MacArthur writes: The hope of the Messiah lies at the heart of the Old Testament.  From the third chapter of Genesis (Gen. 3:15) to the third chapter of Malachi (Mal. 3:1), the Hebrew Scriptures repeatedly proclaim that the Savior is coming.  In fact, all three parts of the Old Testament canon—the Law, the Psalms, and the Prophets—make precise predictions about Him and His ministry (cf. Luke 24:25-27, 44-45). 1   Scripture unquestionably reveals Jesus as the Messiah—Israel’s Deliverer.  The definition of the Hebrew word “Messiah” (Mashiach) and means “anointed one”. The New Testament counterpart is the Greek word “Christ” (Christos).  Dr. John MacArthur elaborates: “Christ is the Greek equivalent of the Hebrew Messiah, God’s long waited deliverer of Israel, the supreme ‘Anointed One’, the coming High Priest, King, Prophet, and Savior.” 2   Dr. Greg Harris writes: “Christ and Messiah are interchangeable words that mean the same thing.  John 1:41 states that Andrew first found ‘his own brother Simon and said to him, ‘We have found the Messiah’ (which translated means Christ).’” 3 As Jesus was passing through Samaria and wearied from His long journey, He stopped to rest at [Jacobs] a well at about noon.   Shortly after a Samaritan woman came to retrieve water.  Jesus asked her for a drink.  Perplexed by Jesus’ request she said: How is it that You, being a Jew, ask me for a drink since I am a Samaritan woman? (For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans.)  Jesus answered and said to her, ‘If you knew the gift of God, and who it is who says to you, ‘Give Me a drink,’ you would have asked Him, and He would have given you living water… the water that I shall give him shall become in him a well of water springing up to eternal life.’ (Jn. 4:9-10, 14b).   When the woman requested for Jesus to give her living water, in His omniscience He recited the woman’s promiscuous past and her current immoral relationship.  Awestruck, she perceived Him to be a prophet (Jn. 4:15-19).  After further dialogue with Jesus, “The woman said to Him, ‘I know that Messiah is coming (He who is called Christ); when that One comes, He will declare all things to us.’  Jesus said to her, ‘I who speak to you am He.”’ (Jn. 4:25-26 emphasis added). Jesus revealed to the lowly, irreputable Samaritan woman that He is the Messiah. The MacArthur Commentary on the Gospel of John...

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