Theology


King David knew God disproved of polygamy—and that marriage is only between one man and one woman and has been that way from the beginning: “For this cause a man shall leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave to his wife; and they shall become one flesh.” (Gen. 2:24).  Moreover, God commanded explicit laws regarding marriage for Israel’s kings: “Neither shall he multiply wives for himself, lest his heart turn away; nor shall he greatly increase silver and gold for himself.” (Deut. 17:17). Furthermore, all kings of Israel were commanded by God to write the entire law and read it daily, to have God’s law upon their minds. “Now it shall come about when he sits on the throne of his kingdom, he shall write for himself a copy of this law on a scroll in the presence of the Levitical priests.  And it shall be with him, and he shall read it all the days of his life, that he may learn to fear the LORD his God, by carefully observing all the words of this law and these statutes.” (Deut. 17:18-19).  Yet King David clearly violated God’s law of marriage with his polygamous lifestyle.  He had eight wives: Michal, Ahinoam, Abigail, Macaah, Haggith, Abital, Eglah, and Bathsheba, not to mention his numerous concubines, many of which bore him children.  The exact number of concubines David possessed is not revealed in Scripture, but by examining certain passages, one could surmise the number was considerable. For example: “…David took more concubines and wives from Jerusalem, after he came from Hebron; and more sons and daughters were born to David.” (2 Sam. 5:13).  Furthermore, Scripture reveals more information about King David’s concubines. When David was fleeing from his son Absalom, who was trying to kill him (fulfilling Nathan’s prophecy 2), the King hastily vacated his residence in Jerusalem: “So the king went out and all his household with him. But the king left ten concubines to keep the house.” (2 Sam. 15:16–emphasis added). David commissioned “ten concubines” to stay behind and look after the royal house he vacated.  Perhaps many more concubines left with King David. Regardless, David’s collection of wives and concubines was a direct violation of God’s law, to which King David was certainly privy (cf. Deut. 17:17a).  “Then it happened”, is howthe eleventh chapter of 2 Samuel begins.  Many times, the Bible employs such strong transitioning language to alert the reader that a drastic change of events is about to occur.  Such was the case with King David, as David had just sent his military commander Joab and his army to engage in battle with...

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Much can be written regarding the greatness of David’s faithful service to God and his promised eternal legacy, which will ultimately be fulfilled at Jesus Christ’s second coming when He will rule on David’s throne.  However, the focus of this article, is of an entirely different aspect of King David’s greatness; the great sins he committed against God.  Even though David was considered “a man after God’s own heart” (1 Sam. 13:14, Ps. 89:20, Acts 13:22), God’s chosen king of Israel (1 Sam. 16:12, 1 Chr. 17:7), “the apple of God’s eye” (Ps. 17:8), and the recipient of God’s “unconditional [Davidic] covenant” (2 Sam. 7:12-16); he committed numerous sins against God.  Moreover, some of those sins permanently affected the lives of many people, as will be shown.  In fact, numerous lives were needlessly lost because of David’s foolishness and sin, yet God deemed him a man with “integrity of heart and of uprightness” (1 Kin. 9:4).   Furthermore, God is omniscient and foreknows all things (1 John 3:20) and obviously knew that David would fall into serious transgressions, yet He still chose David to be king of Israel: “I took you [David] from the pasture, from following the sheep, that you should be ruler over My people Israel.” (2 Sam. 7:8b).  In fact, despite David’s iniquities God made an everlasting covenant with him: “…When your days are complete and you lie down with your fathers, I will raise up your descendant after you, who will come forth from you, and I will establish his kingdom.  He shall build a house for My name, and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever.” (2 Sam. 7:12-13-brackets added).     Considering this glorious promise God had made to David, we will examine some of his sins.   The relatively young David had just learned from his dear friend Jonathan, that King Saul (Jonathan’s father), was seeking to kill him (1 Sam. 20).  So, David, fearing for his life, fled.  It would begin a time in David’s life when he lived in constant fear of King Saul.  In fact, virtually the rest of the book of 1 Samuel (chapters 20-26), depicts David frantically evading Saul.  At the onset of his flight, David came to the city of Nob where he met the priest Ahimelech. (1 Sam. 21:1).  Being paranoid and afraid that Ahimelech would tell King Saul of his whereabouts, David proceeded to lie to the man of God.  Instead of trusting that God would deliver him from evil [as David penned in many of his Psalms] and truthfully explain to Ahimelech his plight concerning King Saul, David chose to deceive the...

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The greatness of king David is clearly seen in the Bible immediately upon making his debut in 1 Sam. 16:12.  No other human name in Scripture is mentioned more times than “David”, (1,080 times).  Amazingly, even the Lord and Savior “Jesus” [Christ] is a distant second at (911 times), following in third place is “Moses” (833 times), and just for the record “Abraham/Abram” only (273 times).  Furthermore, the name of David is referenced fifty-five times in the New Testament, which commenced over a thousand years after he reigned as king of Israel (1011 to 971 B.C.).  As a young lad God had chosen David and put His Spirit upon him: “So he [Jesse] sent and brought him [David] in. Now he was ruddy, with beautiful eyes and a handsome appearance.  And the LORD said, ‘Arise, anoint him; for this is he.’   Then Samuel took the horn of oil and anointed him in the midst of his brothers; and the Spirit of the LORD came mightily upon David from that day forward…” (1 Sam. 16:12a, 13a).  Most Christians know the story of “David and Goliath” and thoroughly appreciate the victory achieved by David despite being a significant underdog.  He was only a youth and a fledgling to the ravages of battle, yet he slew the nearly ten-foot tall and formidable Philistine warrior, armed only with a sling and a small stone. (1 Sam. 17:40-51).  One divinely placed stone hurled from David’s sling smashed into Goliath’s forehead, incapacitating him and abruptly ending the battle–thus began David’s legacy of greatness.   However, David was not acting on his own, it was God who delivered Goliath into his hands.  In fact, God was responsible every time David emerged triumphant in battle– for He was always with him: “And I have been with you wherever you have gone, and have cut off all your enemies from before you; and I will make you a name like the name of the great ones who are in the earth.” (1 Chr. 17:8). Scripture tells us that David was considered “a man after God’s own heart”: “And after He had removed him [Saul as king of Israel], He raised up David to be their [Israel’s] king, concerning whom He also testified and said, ‘I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after My heart, who will do all My will.’” (Acts 13:22).  A designation God gave to no other prior servant of His.  Furthermore, as the chosen nation of Israel is considered “the apple of God’s eye” (Zech. 2:8), so to, was David chosen to be king of Israel and “the apple of God’s eye” (1...

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Peter: Forgiveness and Restoration

Peter: Forgiveness and Restoration


Posted By on Mar 23, 2018

  “But I have prayed for you, that your faith should not fail; and when you have returned to Me, strengthen your brethren.”                                                                                                           Luke 22:32                                                                                                       As Satan did with Job, he approached God to ask for permission to assail Peter: “And the Lord said, Simon, Simon! Indeed, Satan has asked for you, that he may sift you as wheat.  But I have prayed for you, that your faith should not fail; and when you have returned to Me, strengthen your brethren.” (Luke 22:31-32–NKJ–brackets added).  Some liberal theologians believe that Jesus Christ’s prayer failed to accomplish what He had requested of His Father.  They surmise this because Peter denied Jesus three times, only moments after Jesus had prayed for him (Luke 22:55-60).  Their foolish conjecture [heresy], if it were true, certainly would place Christ’s deity and omnipotence in question.  It is true however, that Peter miserably failed by denying Jesus Christ in the ensuing moments leading up to Jesus’ crucifixion.  However, after the Lord’s resurrection and during His re-appearance, He mercifully and graciously restored Peter (Jn. 21:15-17).   Jesus instructed Peter to adorn self-sacrificing allegiance to Him and to encourage and instruct the brethren.  Thereafter, Peter’s faith proved to be a bedrock, in which believers can look to him [his epistles] for guidance and hope. In this article I plan to show that Jesus prayer was indeed effectual and was evidence of God’s forgiveness, because He restored Peter to a high level of trust shepherding many of God’s flock.   For instance, in the book of Acts, especially after Pentecost, when Christ had poured out the Holy Spirit upon Peter and 119 other disciples in the Upper Room (Acts 2:1-4, 17, 33), from that day on, Peter boldly preached the gospel of Christ, amidst extreme hostility and persecution.  He evidenced strong agapē love and faith in Jesus–the type of love Jesus sought, when He asked Peter three times, “Do you love Me?” (Jn. 21:15-17).   In fact, not only did Peter preach with power, but it’s obvious that he was given the authority [from above], to offer repentance and forgiveness.  The Bible records three separate occasions where Peter addressed the multitude, Jewish leaders and the Sanhedrin [Israel’s highest religious governing body].  He courageously indicted them for murdering Jesus.  But, he also offered them repentance and forgiveness (Acts 2:23, 39,...

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God bestows “common grace” to all men.  That is because God loves all of mankind.  God provides the necessities of life, including the way of salvation (Jn. 3:16).  Scripture speaks frequently to the concept of God’s common grace.  However, there are instances which only God knows, when He withholds the providing of certain necessities.  Scripture does say that God works all things together for good to those who love Him (Rom. 8:28).  All Christians must accept this fact, for it’s His sovereign will to do as He pleases.  Mercifully, God provides for all of mankind, whether they love Him or not and believe in Him or not. Uniquely, Christians receive God’s “special” love, a love that will not only manifest itself physically, but will inevitably carry over into heaven–His love will never cease (Jn. 6:40, 1 Jn. 2:24-25, 4:9, Rom. 5:8, 1 Cor. 13:8, 13).  All people have the opportunity for God’s special love, but, an obstacle which hinders most of them, has been the same obstacle for last 2,000 years: “…Christ crucified, to Jews a stumbling block, and to Gentiles foolishness.” (1 Cor. 1:23, and also Acts 4:12).  “That if you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you shall be saved.” (Rom. 10:9).  If only all people would clear this hurdle [belief in Jesus Christ alone], God’s temporal common grace, would turn into eternal love. So what is God’s “common grace”?  To put it concisely, Pastor John MacArthur  defines it as: “…a term theologians use to describe the goodness of God to all mankind universally.” 1  That “goodness” of God is manifested in several ways.  For instance, 1) God provides for mankind the necessities of life and daily sustenance (Matt. 5:45, Acts 14:15-17, 17:25). 2) He allows them to make independent decisions, even many that are ungodly and displeasing to Him.  3) He  allows them to enjoy His creation; its beauty and splendor (Ps. 50:2). 4) He gives talents, knowledge, and physical prowess to all people–many for prosperous purposes.  5)  He sets a government and leadership over the people (Rom. 13:1-5)  6) He restrains sin and evil (Rom. 2:15).   And there are many more ways God is kind  to all of humanity. In this article, I want to focus on one particular way God displays common grace, which is provisionally.  God’s graciously and mercifully bestows goodness to mankind equally: “”The LORD is good to all, and His mercies are over all His works.” (Ps. 145:9). . In Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, He said; “…for He [God] causes His sun to rise on the evil...

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We are pleased to be announcing this book! “The Bible Expositor’s Handbook -Old Testament Digital Edition, by Dr. Greg Harris” There isn’t a book we recommend more highly than this, for every Christian expositor of God’s Word; whether male or female, regardless of age, station in life–every expositor will be blessed by the this book’s unique ability to guide the reader through Scripture, illuminating the interwoven history and redemptive plan God has provided through His Son, the Messiah Jesus.   Each chapter brings forth the reader’s ability to understand Scripture in a deeper, richer and worshipful manner, producing joy.   A special thanks to Dr. Greg Harris and B&H Academic for this rare and needed book, which continues to enrich our daily studies. This book can be purchased online at B&H Academic. New book by Dr. Greg Harris, The Bible Expositor’s Handbook—Old Testament Digital Edition    ...

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